• About Ann,  Ann’s People

    “My dearest Elizabeth”

    A workshop presented by Leila Straub, ALBW, Apr 4, 2022 Content 1. What letters do we have and what is Ann writing about? 2. What do the letters look like? 3. Ann’s style of writing 4. The process behind transcribing 5. Reading Ann’s handwriting 6. DIY Transcription   1. What letters do we have and what is Ann writing about? Ann Walker’s letters to her sister Elizabeth can be found in the Crow Nest papers, folder CN:103/4, in the West Yorkshire Archive. The collection contains letters written between 1832 and 1835. Most of the letters were written between Ann Walker and Elizabeth Sutherland but the folder also contains letters to/from…

  • About Ann

    Ann’s Artwork

    By Ivana Nika and Diane Halford There is much talk in both Ann Walker’s and Anne Lister’s diaries about Ann sketching, painting and having drawing lessons (usually with Mr Browne or Mr Horner). There are no sketchbooks belonging to Ann known to have survived, although the hunt for one continues. There has also been no discovery of any proven images of Ann Walker herself yet. There are, however, several sketches, doodles and drawings known to have been completed by Ann Walker that still exist. This short blog will show you those images and the context in which they were created. Family History In the 1830s and 1840s Ann took a…

  • Ann’s People

    Ann’s Aunts, Uncles and Cousins

    By Martin Walker [This page will be continuously updated as more is discovered about this family] Ann had numerous aunts, uncles and cousins and many are mentioned in her own diary, Anne Lister’s diaries and archive documents. This blog seeks to briefly introduce these family members so that the documents we are finding can be placed in Ann’s life more accurately. Ann’s parents were John Walker (1753-1823) and Mary Edwards (1763-1823); they were married on 18 June 1795 at Halifax Minster. Ann’s father had four brothers and sisters: Mary, William, Elizabeth and Ann (Aunt Ann of Cliff Hill). Only Elizabeth married – a Priestley – and had children. Of Ann’s…

  • About Ann

    Ann’s Return

    By Dorjana Širola and Diane Halford (Updated 14/5/2023) The Last Trip In the early morning of 20th June 1839, Ann Walker and Anne Lister left Shibden Hall together for the last time. The women loaded up their carriage and set off for a tour of Scandinavia and the Russian Empire. They first travelled to London, where they hired a married couple as servants, then crossed the Channel, continuing their overland journey to Hamburg, then sailed across to Copenhagen. They spent some time exploring Denmark, before sailing to Helsingborg and travelling around Sweden and Norway, with stays in Oslo, Gothenburg, Stockholm and Uppsala, as well as visiting Swedish copper, silver and…

  • Ann's Places

    Adney Bridge, Shibden Park

    Adney Bridge, a small bridge that leads from Shibden Hall to the Gatehouse in Shibden Park, was so named by Anne Lister. Anne had this bridge built in 1835 as she renovated her home, Shibden Hall, employing the services of John Harper, an architect from York. Adney was the nickname that Anne gave her wife, Ann Walker and mentioned this name throughout her diary entries which cover their relationship. It is sometimes spelled with an ”e” (Adney) and sometimes without (Adny). Anne and Ann took the sacrament together on Easter day in 1834 at Holy Trinity Goodramgate, York and considered themselves married. Their union is widely considered to be the…

  • Ann’s People

    (Aunt) Ann Walker

    Family Ann Walker was the youngest of five children born to William & Elizabeth Walker in 1757. Her siblings were Mary (1747-1822), William (1749-1804), Elizabeth (1750-1829) and John (1753-1823). 1   The Walkers were wealthy wool merchants, owned stock and a vast amount of property that only grew over time. Ann, like her sister Mary and brother William never married. Her sister Elizabeth married John Priestley and brother John married Mary Edwards. John & Mary were the parents of Ann Walker of Crow Nest. Ann Walker Sr was Ann’s aunt. After Ann’s sister Mary died in 1822, she was referred to as Mrs. Ann Walker or Ann Walker Sr. In…

  • Guest Blogs

    Ann Walker’s Coat of Arms – A Quest for Social Standing?

    By Lynn Shouls 25 February 2022 In 1832, when Ann Walker made a chance reacquaintance with neighbouring landowner Anne Lister, she was a single woman of considerable means. By that time, Anne had mingled with the aristocracy for several years, but had come to realise that she could not aspire to the riches or the status necessary to be fully accepted into their world (Whitbread 2020, 301). She decided that Ann Walker could fulfil her desires and financial aspirations, and began to court her that year. On Easter Sunday in March 1834, Ann and Anne took communion together in church to solemnise their commitment to one another.  In 1842, Ann…

  • Ann’s People

    Samuel Washington

    By Deb Woolson Early Years Samuel was born and baptized in 1797, the youngest of the five children of Esther (née Mann) and James Washington. The Washington family were tenants in a home owned by Ann’s grandfather William Walker, which would have then passed on to Ann’s uncle, and James was the bookkeeper for the Walker business per his death notice in 1839. Sam’s mother, Esther, died in 1842. In 1822, prior to his marriage, Sam was mentioned in the History, Directory & Gazetteer of County of York with his occupation being listed as schoolmaster & land surveyor.1 Where he was schoolmaster is unknown to date. Marriage Sam married Hannah…

  • Ann's Places

    The Piece Hall – Halifax Landmark

    A short blog on the events at the Piece Hall in Halifax and the connection to Ann Walker and Anne Lister. In 1779, the Piece Hall in Halifax was built on land donated by John Caygill, a wealthy merchant, replacing the original Cloth Hall of 1572. It was designed by Thomas Bradley with a large courtyard surrounded by over 315 small rooms on three sides, north, south and west. Due to the slope of the ground, there were three levels on the eastern side that taper to two levels to the west. Cloth piece trading, 30-yard length fabric, would take place every Saturday for two hours of each week. Ann…

  • Google Map of some addresses Ann Walker visited in London
    About Ann

    Ann Walker’s 5 Days In London

    By Diane Halford (Updated 18 July 2021 – Acre Lane relatives) This blog follows the footsteps of Ann Walker’s 5 days in London from 8th – 12th June 1834, finding out more about the places she visited, and what the buildings (if they still stand) look like in July 2021. You can read Ann’s entire diary entries at the Diary Comparison Portal 8th June 1834 “left at 1.10 [gap] arrived at 26 Dover St. ½ past 6 oclock could not be taken in –  rooms bespoken by Mrs. Hawkins at 13 Albemarle St. rooms up 3 flights of stairs at the rate of 7 guineas per week …” West Yorkshire…