• Ann's Places

    Ann Walker in Paris

    By Julie Gonnet During her 1834 honeymoon trip with Anne Lister, Ann Walker discovered Paris. Through her diary and her letters, we can follow in her footsteps and get her first impressions of a foreign capital. As she prepared to leave on her honeymoon trip with Anne Lister in June 1834, Ann Walker merely told her relatives she was “going to Paris for a few weeks”1. Her journey took her far beyond, across the whole of France and as far as Italy and Switzerland, but she did stay in the French capital from 17th to 23rd of June, and from 21st to 24th of August, on her way back to…

  • Ann's Places,  Legacy

    Ann’s Ledger Stone & Update

    A blog by In Search of Ann Walker (ISAW), Friends of St Matthew’s Churchyard (FoSMC) and Anne Lister Birthday Week (ALBW) to record the process of obtaining a ledger stone for Ann Walker and her two aunts buried with her. Ann’s burial Ann Walker died on 25th February 1854 after a short illness. More information on the death of Ann Walker can be found here – The Last Days of Ann Walker She was buried in a vault inside Old St Matthew’s Church on 3 March 1854, with Rev. Charles Musgrave conducting the service. Her aunts Mary Walker and Ann Walker predeceased Ann and are also buried in the same…

  • Ann’s People

    (Aunt) Mary Walker

    A look into the life of the lesser known of Ann Walker’s paternal unmarried aunts, Mary Walker. She spent her life living at Crownest and Cliff Hill. In this blog, we separate the two Ann Walker’s (niece and aunt) by using the names Ann Walker and Aunt Ann Walker. Family Mary was the oldest child of William & Elizabeth Walker, born in 1747. Her siblings were :1   Her brother, John, was Ann Walker’s father. She was baptized 17 September 1747 at St Matthew’s Church in Lightcliffe.2. The Walker family were wealthy wool merchants and owned a vast amount of property. Elizabeth, Mary’s mother, was born a Caygill. Her brother…

  • Ann’s People

    Elizabeth, Evan Charles and Annie Sutherland

    Author’s note: Sometimes, if you are very fortunate, you can glean a lot of information from old newspaper articles. The quality of the copy isn’t always great, as you will see, but they do help fill out a story. Here are some interesting bits about Ann Walker’s nieces and nephew, Elizabeth and George Sutherland’s surviving children – Elizabeth, Evan Charles and Annie. Elizabeth, Ann and brother John Walker shared the sad experience of losing their parents in 1823 at the ages of 22, 20 and 19 years respectively. They lived together, travelled together, and then with the death of John in 1830, Elizabeth and Ann became the last of their…

  • About Ann

    Ann Walker’s Giving

    While Ann Walker was away in the Russian Empire over the winters of 1839 and 1840 she wrote back three times to England to David Booth to give instructions on what to give to her tenants/people she knew. This blog looks at Ann Walker’s giving in these letters and discusses what they contain. Note the bolded names in the letters have been done so by the author to emphasise that there is more information in the blog about these individuals. Ann Walker (St Petersburg) to David Booth (Halifax) 7 October 1839 Ann wrote to David Booth to explain her wishes for her tenants and people she knew. Booth was described…

  • Legacy

    Ann Walker’s Fundraising Appeal 2023

    Continuing the charitable tradition begun by William & Ann Walker Every year since 2020, In Search of Ann Walker has fundraised annually for a local foodbank in Ann Walker’s name because of the legacy she left in her will. This was similar to the one her uncle William left in his. In 2020 we raised £1300 for Wyke Foodbank In 2021 we raised £1686 for Brighouse Central Foodbank in 2022 we raised £2661 for Brighouse Central Foodbank Read on for more information about Ann’s will and charity. Ann Walker’s Will Ann wrote her final will in 1841[1]. It was proved in May 1854, shortly after she died. Apart from several…

  • Ann’s People

    Eliza Ainsworth (née Bentley)

    Reproduced with permission from Lancashire Archives, Lancashire County CouncilWCW/Supra/C950/7 / Signature on Eliza Ainsworth’s Will The name Mrs Ainsworth will be familiar to those who have seen the television series “Gentleman Jack”, as the wife of Rev Thomas Ainsworth. This blog will fill in some of the blanks surrounding Eliza and her friendship with Ann Walker. Family Eliza was the fifth and youngest child of Michael and Sarah Bentley. She was baptised on 4 August 1786 in Manchester.1  Sarah’s father was a Justice of the Peace in the County of Lancaster. 24 July 1787 Manchester Mercury ©The British Library Board Listed in The Admission Register of the Manchester School Vol…

  • Ann's Places

    An Overview of Asylums in England to 1850 and the Connection with Ann Walker

    Contents Preface To better understand Ann Walker’s mental health journey in the first half of the 19thCentury, it is helpful to consider the era and societal attitudes to see what asylums andrelated systems were not and to avoid framing her experience by modern standards.This piece will provide an overview of the growth of asylums from the early 18th CenturyEnglish history until she died in 1854. It will also examine the role of the LunacyCommission in managing the care and property of mentally ill people. Because AnnWalker was a part of society’s upper class, and that will be the primary focus.Colloquially, the terms ‘mad’, ‘madhouse’, and ‘mad doctor’ were used interchangeablywith…

  • A photo of Anne Lister's funerary hatchment which is located in Shibden Hall.
    About Ann

    Ann’s Mourning of Anne

    This blog seeks to show the ways in which Ann Walker explicitly and implicitly mourned her wife after her death in 1840. She would not have been able to grieve in the way we would expect a widow to do so due to the lack of acknowledgment and acceptance of the true nature of their relationship within wider society. These facts are based on primary resources found in the archives. Anne’s Death and Ann’s Return Anne Lister died in September 1840 while travelling with Ann Walker in Kutaisi, Georgia, then part of the Russian Empire. Although it is not known exactly what Anne Lister died of, letters found by a…

  • Ann’s People

    George Sackville Sutherland

    George Sackville Sutherland was Ann Walker’s eldest nephew and the second child of George Mackay Sutherland and Elizabeth Sutherland (née Walker). He was often known as Sackville, and to avoid confusion with his father, George Mackay Sutherland, I will refer to him as Sackville throughout this blog. Birth and Baptism Sackville was born on 11 March 1831 – the date is mentioned in a letter between Ann and her sister Elizabeth, and twice mentioned in Anne Lister’s journal.1 Sackville was likely born in Crow Nest, Lightcliffe, as the Sutherlands had returned there in January 1831.2 He was later baptised in St Matthew’s Church in Lightcliffe (Now Old St Matthew’s Churchyard)…