Ann Walker’s Journal Keyword Finder

Search By Tiffany April
Transcriptions by the ISAW Transcription Team

A quick search tool to help you locate various points of textual reference within Ann Walker’s Journal.

In the Search Field insert a word as in example ‘Dearest’ and the search shall return all cases of the word within the journal, the corresponding date, a link to the Ann(e)’s Diary Comparison with full journal text for each journal, and both the actual manuscript page and the West Yorkshire Archive Service transcriptions for the relevant entry.

If you are looking to find a certain date and its corresponding entry please use the companion Ann Walker’s Journal Date Finder.

Key

[–crossed out text–]
[u_]underlined text[_u]
r. – recto or right-hand page
v. – verso or left-hand page

Line Numbers correspond with the actual lines of the Journal.
Starting with 1. as the top margin whether Ann has placed a page number in or not.

DateLineTranscriptionISAW ComparisonWYAS Journal ScanWYAS File
0v.01[gap] £ s dComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
0v.02June 6th [gap] 7 .. 8 – 6.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
0v.03MComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
0v.04Blue Spectacles. [gap] Tooth Tincture & brushesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
0v.05timber very best Archangel 2/6 per foot [written upside down]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.011ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.02[1834.] June 4th dearest very poorly. bad bilious headache. gave up lodgingsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.03left Mrs. Bewley’s 3/10 called at Dr. Belcombe’s, he, out of town.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.04received sketching case from Mr. Browne, & proposal for 5 or 6ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.05weeks sketching excursion by giving up convent – I declined itComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.06as not feasible this year Left Kettle & stand at Cattle &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.07Barber’s to be cleaned by them & sent to Dr. & Mrs. HenryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.08Belcombe the following day. called at Mr. Duffin’s. Mrs. DuffinComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.09not at home. Left York 3/30 o’clock. At Tadcaster 4/30 forwardedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.10by coach to Leeds a parcel to Miss Atkinson containing headsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.11in wax of celebrated Personages. Ferrybridge 6/30ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.12at Doncaster 10/8. Wished to be taken to Bawtry, InnkeeperComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.13persuaded us to go to Barnby Moor – arrived 20/10 oclock stayed allComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-04r.14night & till friday at 3 oclock – a very comfortable Inn –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-05r.15[June] 5th breakfasted alone dearest so ill did not rise till 20/8 oclock -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-05r.16in the afternoon walked on Sheffield road & in the garden -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-05r.17[--Mr.--] Reverend Mr. & Mrs. Canning (brother to Sir Stratford Canning)ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-05r.18and 3 ladies arrived – June 6th left at 3 oclock very oldComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-06r.18June 6th left at 3 oclock very oldComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-06r.19post boy to Newark – from Scarthing Moor – arrived at GeorgeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-06r.20Inn Grantham 9 oclock – bed room thro’ small sittingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-06r.21room upstairs – house newly painted smell of paintComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-06r.22very disagreeable, only one washing stand in bedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-06r.23room & no key to door – after much rowing bothComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-06r.24produced – bed at 11 oclock – tire of wheel of carriageComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-06r.25to fasten – [June] 7th Water so bad made tea at breakfastComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07r.25to fasten – [June] 7th Water so bad made tea at breakfastComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07r.26taste quite disagreeable – off at 10/15 for Witham common.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07r.27dearest rather better -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07r.28[large gap on page]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07r.29Saw Burleigh [Burghley] House. nothing particular in theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07r.30house more than all state houses – very littleComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07r.31statuary, & only a few specimens scattered in roomsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07r.32here & there – a pretty view ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0002
1834-06-07v.012ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.02of 3 of the Churches at Stamford from one of the windows.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.03collection of paintings good – much pleased with theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.04celebrated one of Xt. [Christ] blessing the elements. by CarloComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.05Dolci. Arrived at Stevenage 8/20 enquired in howComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.06short a time we could be taken to London with 4 horses,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.07reply; 4 hours – determined to stay all night, veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.08tired & dearest very weak – comfortable rooms, greatComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.09deal of China in sitting room – Inn rather resemblesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.10a foreign – a gallery outside 2nd story Mr. & Mrs. CanningComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-07v.10and 3 ladies there [June 8th] left at 1/10 [gap] arrived at 26.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-08v.11and 3 ladies there [ June 8th] left at 1/10 [gap] arrived at 26.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-08v.12Dover Street 1/2 past six oclock could not be taken in -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-08v.13rooms bespoken by Mrs. Hawkins at 13 Albe-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-08v.14marle Street – rooms up 3 flights of stairs at theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-08v.15rate of 7. guineas per week – dined at seven.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-08v.16Veal cutlets, Green peas soup. gooseberry tart -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-08v.17wrote to Dumergue, appointment at 3 oclock monday.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.18June 9th Breakfasted at ten. began a letter to myComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.19Aunt Walker measured for habit by Mr. Hutton – at 3 -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.20to Dumergue. teeth filed & one drawn – at 5/15ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.21went shopping, Hammersley. Barker. RundellComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.22& Bridge for watch Ring – Lund Cornhill toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.23buy blue spectacles – 1..10 – Jones for patent lights.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.24on return Mr. Hutton came to try on habit.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.25dined at 9 oclock, then wrote part of a letterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-09v.26to my sister, tea at 11 – bed at 12 -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10v.27June 10th Breakfasted at eleven – finished letter toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.013ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.02my Aunt W- [Walker] & continued one to my sister, soup atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.032/30 oclock went shopping – Hammersley, Lund -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.04Newgate Street Rowney & Foster, 51. Rathbone Place for sketching stool -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.05& drawing paper – bought Sharpe’s Peerage -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.06at 13- 6/10 at half past off for Acre Lane -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.07arrived there 7/15 Aunt & Uncle looking thin, sheComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.08in tears first half hour – Anne at 8. York TerraceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.09Regent’s Park – with Mrs. & J. Dyson. – Delia & CharlesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.10Edwards – Mr. Egam in London all going toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.11Ascot races on thursday. Eliza & George at school,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.12John Henry & Frederick well – all at home muchComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.13grown & much improved – Looly very beautifulComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.14[- Told -] Asked if I should go to Lidgate on my return?ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.15No – going to Shibden Hall – & Let Lidgate surpriseComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.16& sorrow expressed – said I was going to ParisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.17for a few weeks – heard Maria play – sawComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.18Anne’s drawing selected 3 – one head, flowerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.19piece of Roses &c – & one Landscape – forgotComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.20to bring them away – Left at 10 – told that itComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.21was said I was going abroad for 3 or 4 years &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.22forsaking all my old friends – left a messageComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.23for my Uncle Thomas of regret that I could not call -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.24back at 13- at 10-11 – went immediatelyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.25to bed, dearest returned about twelve fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-10r.26Whitehall. June 11th awoke atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-11r.26Whitehall. June 11th awoke atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0003
1834-06-11v.014ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.027/15 attempted to get up – – very bilious wentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.03to bed again – did not breakfast tillComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.043/15 & not finally dressed till 4/25 Of courseComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.05did not set out for Dover as previously fixed.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.06remained with dearest in house all day -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.07finished letter to my sister – heard one to LadyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.08Harriet & Mrs. Lawton – wrote to J. Chapman -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.09told her – I was going to Paris, should be backComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.10by 1st August & begged she would write as soonComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.11as she could after my return – wrote a noteComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.12to my Uncle Thomas telling him, how it wasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.13that I did not call upon him; cut theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.14leaves of Sharpe’s Peerage – Mr. FreemanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.15came to dearest dined at 8. tea atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.161015 selected 3 drawings to take with me -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-11v.16Bed 12/30 In bed 1/30 oclock June 12th BreakfastedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.17Bed 12/30 In bed 1/30 oclock June 12th BreakfastedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.181045 & paid bill £15 – 0 [gap] waiter 12/. chambermaid 8/.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.19off at 1/45 called at Hawkins & left boxes & drawings inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.20his care – then to Warren’s Regent Street with a note for Mrs.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.21Lawton, parcel to Hammersley – & left there 2 lettersComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.22for Post Office out of London at 2 oclock – Cap of carriage wheelComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.23taken off at Greenwich Toll gate, by the carelessness of aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.24carrier’s cart, George went back to find it; man made anComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.25apology, got it repaired at coach maker’s by the gate for 1/.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.26intended to see Rochester Cathedral, but prevented by rain.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12v.27a very comfortable inn, numerous plants &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12r.015ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12r.02every appearance of a foreign hotel – got someComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12r.03sandwiches – then to Sittingbourne, where asked toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12r.04take four horses but declined. arrived at Can-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-12r.05terbury 10/20 oclock tea. & to bed at 11/30ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.06June 13th -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.07Up before 8 o’clock – Canterbury Cathedral -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.08Length of choir 180 feet, height 80 feet, to vaultedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.09roof – 38 feet in breadth between the two side doors.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.10thought to be the most spacious of any in the kingdom.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.11The old monkish stalls in two rows on each side removedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.12in 1704 – Archbishop Tennison gave the present throne -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.13Dr. John Grandorge one of the prebendaries who died 1729 – left £500ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.14to be laid-out on the Church; it was determined to employComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.15this money, towards erecting new altar-piece; which was designedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.16by Mr. Burrough (after Sir James) fellow of Caius College Cambridge -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.17It is very lofty, of the corinthian order – a handsome wains-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.18cotting was carried from altar-piece to 2 side doors ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.19the choir – (which has lately 1834 been removed [word crossed out] & nothingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.20remains but the stone screen, the small gothic arches of which one glazed) & aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.21new pavement of black & white marble; at 7 or 8 feet distanceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.22a noble flight of 6 steps of veined marble. above the pavementComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.23continued to doors leading to Trinity Chapel & has inscriptionComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.24on uppermost step in Latin. 1732. ‘To the honor of God, Dorothy NixonComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.25bequeathed this pavement’ Near it was St. Dunstan’s MonumentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.26who died about 988 – Captain Humphrey Pudner in 1753 whenComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.27the Organ was new built was at half the expense of it & would haveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.28contributed much more, if, [--the--] it might have been removedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.29& placed over the choir door – the organ was not opened tillComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.30December 9th 1753 – the day after his funeral – [several words crossed out]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13r.32Mr. Pudner’s design was in 1783 carried into execution when the DeanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0004
1834-06-13v.016ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.02& Chapter, ordered the old organ to be taken down, & present elegantComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.03structure was erected over gothic screen at the entrance -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.04The organ is again removed to one of the side galleriesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.05& the keys are played at the distance of 100 feet fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.06the pipes -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.07Monument: Archbishop Chicheley’s.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.08[gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.09Chapel of St. Michael often called the warrior’s chapel aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.10fine monument of Sussex marble, of three figures in Alabaster.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.11in the centre. of Margaret daughter of Thomas Earl of HollandComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.12& her two husbands, 1st Earl of Somerset in armour.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.133. Thomas Duke of Clarence, her second husband Monument ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.14Colonel Prude killed at Maestricht 1632. Sir Thomas Thorn-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.15hurst killed & buried Isle of Rhee 1627. Two others of theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.16Thornhurst family – one of Miss Anne Milles – aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.17very remarkable one of Archbishop Langton appearing as a stoneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.18coffin above ground – A bust & inscription of Sir George RookeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.19who took Gibraltar – a monument of several of Hales family oneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.20of whom died at sea, & manner of his being committedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.21to the deep is shewn here – Brigadier Francis GodfreyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.22buried here 1712 -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.23Holy Trinity Chapel -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.24[gap] Archbishop Walter Reynolds, ArchbishopComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.25Stratford, Archbishop Sudbury, Archbishops Mepham, Brad-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.26warden – marble pavement shewn as Thomas A Becket’sComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.27shrine – Black Princes Monument his coat of Armour -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.28Gauntlet, & sword – _____ near his monument we mayComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.29see where the corner post stood of rail or fence which wasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.30carried round the shrine & kept the crowds at a distance fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.31it – [word crossed out]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.017ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.02[gap] Archbishop Courtney & Theobald Cardinal PoleComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.03Odo Coligny. Cardinal Chastillion.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.04The Cathedral has a ring of 10 bells & a clock which strikes the quarters, on 2 of themComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.05& the hour on 1 much larger than any of the peal, weight 7,500 hangsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.06over the leaden platform under a shed.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.07The Martery [Martyry] where Thomas A Becket took refuge supposingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.08he should be safe from his pursuers, but they assassinated himComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.09there & a piece of the stone that was covered with hisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.10blood, cut out & carried to St. Peter’s at Rome – nearComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.11the Martery a tomb is shewn on which was sculpturedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.12the whole human frame – Name of the gentlemanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.13I forget, but it is supposed he designed it himself -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.14near it, the monument of Dean Wotton taken exactlyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.15as he died in his chair, supposed to have been readyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.16for Divine Service as he is in his robes – behind hisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.17library is also represented, the leaves outermost theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.18names at that time being placed on the [u_]leaves[_u]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.19of books, & not on the backs. 1625 – – -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.20A small confessional is shewn – Gloucester is theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.21only Cathedral where I recollect to have seen orComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.22heard of one – The Cathedral was partially burntComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.23in 1174. Archbishop Chicheley built great part of St Dunstan’sComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.24steeple (or Lantern tower) 1453 – dying, left the finishingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.25to Prior Goldstone. The building of the Cathedral wasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.26begun by Prior Selling, & finished by his successor PriorComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.27Thomas Goldstone – the western cross aisle is s[ai]d to haveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.28been rebuilt by Archbishop Sudbury at his own proper cost -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.29It was about 30 years in building [u_]Arundel steeple[_u] was damagedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.30by November Storm 1703, & obliged to be taken down as low asComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.31the platform & balcony – a circular tower at the east end ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.32Trinity Chapel called Becket’s crown – Almost the whole ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.33the cathedral is built of stone from Caen in Normandy.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13r.34its choir was some years ago new flagged with Portland Stone – in 1788 -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0005
1834-06-13v.018ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.02during the civil wars Cromwell made a stable of it forComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.03his dragoons, but after the Restoration it was repaired -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.04The city of Canterbury was given entirely to the Bishops by Wiliam Rufus.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.05it was a city 900 years B.C.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.06Dunge hill or Danish Mount, a slip of land covering about 6 acresComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.07extending between Redingate & Wincheap is now converted intoComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.08a promenade, the walk is shaded with limes on each sideComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.09& is 13 feet wide & 1130 feet long – The terrace is 12 feet wide & 1840 longComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.10a serpentine walk bordered with quick thorn fences, & fencedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.11by stone post & chains to the top of the mount, on which is a stoneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.12Pillar fronting the cardinal points, erected by a subscription of the inha-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.13bitants in 1803 – Ascent to the top 480 feet -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.14[u_]The Castle[_u] what is now so called has no appearance of RomanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.15antiquity. the present building appears to have been the keep or dongon [donjon]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.16of a fortress within which it stood – & of which the boundaries are still discover-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.17able, like that at the castles of Dover, Rochester, & the white Tower atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.18London – as it is built in the same style with them, & about the same time.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.19Dykes & yards contain about 4 acres the Castle had no doubt otherComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.20buildings besides the keep it is now used as a repository by the Gas & waterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.21works Company -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.22The Shops appear very good particularly for Muslins – in which tradeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.23& silk – besides celebrated brawn the town excels – bought someComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.24oranges – & off for Dover at 25 oclock Eugenie sick – rainedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.25nearly all the way to Dover where arrived at 4/30 at Ship InnComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.26taken by Mr. Worthington from Charles Wright about 4 months ago -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.27then bought all his stock Wines &c – Mr. & Mrs. WorthingtonComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.28very civil people – heard from Mr. Birmingham that weComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.29must be ready for the Mail packet at 8 oclock tomorrow morning -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.30wrote part of journal, played on Piano (Broadwood’s) & washedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.31hands &c for dinner, to which sat down at 615. Vermicelli soup -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.32Maintenon Cutlets, plain boiled pudding – Claret, & strawberries.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.33Remains of a Roman Encampment & Watling Street extending from DoverComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13v.34to West Chester.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13r.019ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13r.02dearest wrote to her Aunt message to Sarah to bottle CowslipComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13r.03Wine & to my aunt that I would write to her from Paris – inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-13r.04bed at 10/20 oclock Up. June 14th Up at 6 oclockComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.04bed at 10/20 oclock Up. June 14th Up at 6 oclockComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.05breakfasted 20/8 off to embark 8/20 Mr. Birmingham came to the ShipComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.06Hotel for us – Went to the vessel in a boat sadly tossed by the waves itComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.07being nearly low water off from Dover 10/9. shut eyes then, & then never openedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.08them till close upon Calais harbour, not sick out of Ferret at 20/12 – Went withComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.09Monsieur Kelliac [Quillacq] to Custom House, had to walk all along pier which is very long. & thenComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.10to the Hotel – had some Chablis & biscuits, went to sleep then walked inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.11gallery dinner 340 Sole, Veal cutlets, tart, strawberries, & cherries – off atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.125/12 beset at last Poste before getting to Boulogne by entreaties to go toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.13various Hotels there, one man rode after us & put a card in at the windowComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.14with request to go to Hotel du Nord – arrived at Hotel de Londres atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-14r.157/5 Had tea. Sleeping room out of apartment English beds in bed at 1030 –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-15r.16June 15th Up at 8/10 carriages taken up & wheeles [wheels] greased breakfastedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-15r.179/10 off at 10/15 Strawberries in carriage arrived at Abbeville.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-15r.187/5 Only one room for sleeping & eating – ordered dinner, walkedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-15r.19out went into Church & on the boulevard – dinner at 8 -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-15r.20soup, pike, fricandeau, poulette, pigeon in Peas, apple, & straw-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-15r.21berries, cherries, almonds & biscuits for dessert – lay down in bed atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-15r.2210/20 very bad head ache.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.23[June] 16th Up at 6/30 breakfast 15/9. Off at 15/10. Lord Yarmouth atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.24Hotel de l’Europe – Strawberries at Poix – country veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.25pretty about Marseille chateau [--Count--] Monsieur de Clermont [word crossed out]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.26Tonnerre another chateau a little further on. ChateauComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.27de Monson [Monceau], discovered that we had lost silver fork -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.28arrived at Beauvais – 15/7 – ordered dinner, walked out,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.29thro’ the Grande Place, stopped at Confectioners, to Cathe-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.30dral. The choir much admired, a number of smallComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.31chapels, tomb of cardinal Fourbin [Forbin] par Coustou, restoredComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.32in 1804. & 3 pieces of tapestry the manufacture of this townComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.33city. walked round the Court of the Bishop’s residence, whoComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.34has only 10,000 francs or £400 sterling Per Annum before revolution of LouisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16r.35Philippe he had 20,000 francs. dinner at 8/20 soupComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0006
1834-06-16v.0110ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-16v.02fricaseed poulet, pigeon, Peas, fricandeau, preserveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-16v.03biscuits & strawberries. bed at 10/20ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.04June 17th Up at 15/6 oclock – breakfasted 208 – went toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.05see the Manufactory of Tapestry at 20/10 – very interestingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.0664 or 5 persons constantly employed of which ten were pupils -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.07they work only for the Royal family, the pieces are inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.08gilt frames & so exquisitely finished it is almost im-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.09possible to distinguish them at a little distance fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.10paintings, one of a white dog & a landscape in the back-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.11ground was particularly beautiful, the price 100 guineasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.12English. off from Beauvais 15/10 – After first post a gentlemanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.13in an open carriage requested permission to pass, with aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.14promise that he would stop, if there was only oneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.15pair of horses at the next stage – the law of FranceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.16does not allow one Carriage to pass another -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.17At St. Denis, saw the Abbey in which all most of theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.18Kings of France are interred, [--one of--] the largestComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.19royal vault in Europe; the Church was undergoingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.20repairs, Arrived in Paris 20/6. drove to Meurice’s who hadComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.21only a premier, then to the Hotel du Terrace, whereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.22we got a troisieme, dinner & breakfast from aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.23Cafe – when at dinner Miss Norcliff came in, com-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.24plained excessively of the heat -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-17v.25[gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18v.26June 18th Went to order Gloves of [gap] .. then gaiters,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18v.27shoes of Coste, called on Miss Norcliffe & Miss Becket (sisterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18v.28of the Banker at Leeds) dearest called on Madame de Bourke,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18v.29then we went to Madame Figuerol, to desire her toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18v.30come & take our measures for dresses – had MadameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18v.31Calèt [Calès] in 18 Rue des Vieux Augustins, in the morningComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18r.0111ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18r.02to measure for stays. Went in the evening to the Opera.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18r.03La muette de Portici Ballet rather too longComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18r.04came away before it was over – Received letter fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-18r.05Mrs. Lister & two from E Atkinson forwarded from England.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.06June 19th. Went to the Louvre, 20 halls of statuary.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.07saw the celebrated statue of Diana a la BicheComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.08in Parian marble habited as a huntressComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.09holding in her left hand the bow bent downComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.10whilst with her right she seeks an arrow in theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.11quiver suspended on her shoulder by a thong.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.12It seems that this statue has been in France sinceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.13the reign of Henry 4th The gallery of the paintingsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.14is a quarter of a mile long, we walked to theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.15end & back again, the only picture we had timeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.16really to stop & look at, was a Madonna, ourComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.17Saviour, & St. John by Raphael.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.18Went to the Palais Royal [word crossed out] which is an im-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.19mence [immense] court surrounded by shops of every de-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.20scription, one side of the court is now the residenceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.21of the Duke of Orleans, the eldest son of King LouisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.22Philippe, the Duke de Choiseul, Duke d’Aumale,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.23& – Duke – [gap] are the titles of his sons -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.24The King keeps the workmen constantly employedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.25by improvements but many of his subjects complainComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.26heavily of the burdens & disadvantages of theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.27revolution, the soldiers like him & [word crossed out]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.28Konsequently [consequently] his throne is more secure than itComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.29otherwise would be – . Went to the Exhibition ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19r.30the Arts & Products of the industry of France,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0007
1834-06-19v.0112ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.02there are four very large buildings containing everyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.03thing one can possibly think of, even, to CarpetsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.04made of Cats skins which were very dear, & veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.05pretty. furniture, mirrors & Carpets, particularly elegant,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.06but the most curious & interesting thing was a modelComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.07on a large scale of the interior of a watch, [--made--]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.08constructed for the professors of the Arts & TradesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.09to give lectures upon, the price is 5000 francsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.10but Mr. Perrelet (the maker) says it cost himComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.11so much time & labor, he shall lose by it -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.12some very pretty raised worsted work – niceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.13little foot warmers for a carriage made in aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.14little box form of a footstool with velvet coverComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.15at top. a very nice double bottle rack inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.16rows [doodle of bottle rack] [word crossed out] with two supportersComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.174 feet high – each row being made to lift out -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.18heard of some curious little bellows which we didComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.19not see – ordered bonnet of Madame Thomas, nearlyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.20tempted with Cashmire shawl at de Lisle’s priceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.21£150 English – bought 2 muslin dresses & one black silk -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.22dearest called on Miss Berry’s, they very civil, & advisedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.23her not to buy the shawl – not the mode now – went toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-19v.24the Champs Elysee [Élysées].ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20v.25June 20th. Pother about passports – began letters to Mrs.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20v.26Lister & my Aunt Walker went again to the other threeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20v.27buildings of the Exposition – Rue St. Victor -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20v.28Prefecture about passports – Perrelet, & furnitureComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20v.29Print for Lady Stuart – on returning home found -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20r.0113ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20r.02a card sent by Miss Berrys for their private box atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20r.03the Comedie Francoise [Française]. La jeunesse d’Henri cinq – HotelComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20r.04Garni Hotel de Marie [L’Ecole des maris] – much amused butComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20r.05very tired, Madame [--Mont--] Mante – performed the part of theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20r.06Princess admirably & in a very lady like manner.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20r.07called at Meurice’s on Miss Norcliffe & Miss Beckett.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-20r.08promised to take charge of a watch for her -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.09June 21st Person from Madame Figuerol to try onComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.10dresses – went to Gaiter man & for three gloves -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.11returned to Hotel, became quite overcomeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.12by the heat. Fahrenheit 80 – in our drawing room.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.13finished letters to Mrs. Lister & my Aunt markedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.144 Petticoats. wrote to my sister. told her all weComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.15had seen & done, that I was ‘delighted with it,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.16quite well, & very happy’ – Made a pair ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.17Calico drawers – dearest went to take Coffee withComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.18Lady Charlotte Lindsay & Miss Berrys – who wereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.19very civil – got some information about travellingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.20in Greece, take all our own beds – tents &c -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.21in Turkey – a party of 9. men & 12 horses – makingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.22my drawers when she returned, sat up to finishComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-21r.23them & eat strawberries -.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-22r.24June – 22nd – Breakfasted at 9/15 – put on staysComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-22r.25from Madame Calès – to Church at 11/20 service justComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-22r.26commencing when we got there – Mr. Lefevre readComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-22r.27Exhortation & Communion service, dont know theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-22r.28name of the little stout gentleman who read PrayersComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0008
1834-06-22v.0114ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.02& preached, text Luke 6th – 38th ‘with what measure yeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.03mete withal it shall be measured to you again’ -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.04divided into 2 heads – viz 1st The Reward that attendsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.05virtue & the punishment of vice in this world, & 2ndComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.06what awaits them in a future one – God isComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.07just in all his ways – & tho’ vice may seem to flourishComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.08for a time, & virtue sink into neglect, yet bothComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.09generally receive in this life sooner or later theirComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.10respective merits, but should Infinite wisdom de-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.11cree otherwise, yet here, for one moment to supposeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.12that each will not receive its concomitant doomComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.13in another, is to deprive the Almighty of oneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.14of his first Attributes inscrutible [inscrutable] justice. sermonComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.15last 24 minutes Church a very plain neat building -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.16chairs & benches – except pews for the singers, &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.17the Ambassador (British), & one pew above his – -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.18on returning from Church saw crowds of people entering theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.19Exposition – wrote my name in 12 pairs of Gloves from Roux.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.204 Rue Castiglione. & in 6 from Privat Rue de la Paix numero 18.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.21also wrote Miss Lister’s name in 30 pairs of gloves – mineComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.22from Privat, fit better than those from Roux butComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.23from both the fingers are too long – rain[--ed--]all dayComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.24which has cooled the air several degrees.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.25Cards, from Maurisset 202. Palais Royal, eachComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.26engraved Mademoiselle. instead, of, Miss Walker – dinner at 6/20ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.27Riz au lait, Beef, Vol au vent, & Rice pudding. Forêt cameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.28to dress hair. drove to Bois de Boulogne, walked thereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22v.2940 minutes, at Hotel again 20/10 – got Strawberries &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22r.0115ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22r.02went to bed – coachmen in Paris light their lampsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22r.03820 June 22nd – word Boulanger (baker) derived fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22r.04bouleau, (birch tree) with which the french used (& still)ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-22r.05to light their ovens –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.06June 23rd Up at 6/30, marked 2 pairs of thread gloves,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.07[gap] Guêtrier 2. Place [vendome?], came to fitComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.08on gaiters, price 8 francs – , Perrelet brought watchComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.09says it will serve me well for a while, butComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.10not a very good one – mended gloves – drove toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.11the Bank, Lafitte, Madame de Bourke & Miss Berrys -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.12Collar. bought very dear 32 frances [francs] – another at 12 francs.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.13dinner at 4/30 – at 8. drove to Rue St. Victor walkedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.14thro Tuilleries [Tuileries] gardens – heard of letters forwardedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.15to Geneva – drove to Palais Royal – walked there & inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.16the Garden almost all the trees destroyed by the allies,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.17so that the present ones are quite young timber – gotComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-23r.18Cafe au lait – home at 10/20 –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.19June 24th Up at 6/30 Breakfasted 8/20 off from HotelComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.20de la Terrace (Rue de Rivoli) at 20/11 – thro’ St. VictorComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.21& passed the Gobelin Manufactory of Tapestry – drove aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.22little thro the Forêt de Fontanbleau [Fontainebleau], it is 24 milesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.23in Circumference – arrived at Hotel de la ville deComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.24Lyon at 5/15 ordered dinner – went to the palaceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.25a very large & interesting building, originally begunComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.26as a hunting box by Henry 7th [should be Louis 7th] remodelled by FrancisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.271st & successively improved by Louis 14th 15th & 16th -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.28much improved & magnificently furnished byComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24r.29Buonaparte, who was very fond of it – shewed us the tableComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0009
1834-06-24v.0116ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.02on which he signed his abdication April 5th 1814. took leave ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.03his troops from the cour de cheval blanc. WalkedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.04in Les jardins Anglais, which are beautifully laidComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.05out – saw the tulip tree flourishing plentifully, & growingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.06much higher than I ever saw one in England -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.07Acacias very fine – plain trees particularly so -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.08beds of roses & Rhododendrons raised about 3 feet fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.09the ground but flat, not raised in the middle -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.10returned to Hotel dinner 7/30. Soup – Mutton cutlets, eel,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.11veal Cutlets, Poulet, soufflet, cream, strawberries, & cherries.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-24v.12bed at 9/30 –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.13[June 25th] Up at 7. breakfasted 8/15 wrote journal, off at 15/10 --- [in pencil: for ]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.14[In Pencil: Fossard -] country very beautiful to Joigny – hills allComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.15planted with vines, diversified with small stripsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.16sown with wheat, barley &c – At Sens got some Cofé [Café] auComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.17lait, & saw Cathedral. a very fine monument of the DauphinComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.18son of Louis 15th by Coustou, his chef d’ouvre [oeuvre], oppositeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.19the Altar is the figure of Religion, & that of Immortality holdingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.20the Compass with which it appears to measure with attention the surface of the globe. &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.21[four lines crossed out]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.26one recognises Immortality by the crown upon her head, butComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.27still more by the circle she holds in her hand. She appears toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.28occupy herself in forming with complacency a bundle of symbolicalComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.29attributes of different virtues which characterised the DauphinComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.30such as the balance of Justice, the mirror & serpent of PrudenceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.31the bed of purity & candour &c – Religion is known by the crossComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.32in her hand, & the veil upon her head, her right hand rests uponComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.33two urns which she contemplates, a crown of stars symbolical ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.34celestial rewards. This figure is full of majesty & sweetness &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.0117ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.02the draperies are admirable. On the back part of the pedestalComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.03one sees Time standing upon ruins & debris of every kind which heComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.04tramples under his feet. By means of this elevation he hasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.05already enveloped in his veil one of the urns, the DauphinComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.06dying first, & one sees him endeavoring to extend it over thatComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.07of the Dauphine, who was living when this Mausoleum was begunComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.08& who preferred the model of it to many others – At the side ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.09Time is conjugal love, under the figure of a young man, he holds theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.10torch of Hymen extinguished & reversed & regards with grief a child whoComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.11so afflicts himself by the sight, as to break, a wreath of flowers in hisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.12hands symbolical of the union of the spouse – This part of theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.13Mausoleum is most rich in composition & of the most dignifiedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.14& affecting expression. The figure of Time is boldly developped deliveredComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.15with strength, & learnedly contrasted with that of conjugal love – ThisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.16contrast gives effect & warmth to all that part of the Mausoleum, itComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.17puts itself in opposition with the anterior which is as it ought to be more digni-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.18fied & grave – on the sides of the pedestal are engraved the EpitaphsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.19of the Dauphin & Dauphine written by Cardinal de Luynes, Archbishop of Sens.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.201st almoner (formerly) to the Dauphine – under the Epitaphs areComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.21[word crossed out] emblazoned their escutcheons. without any other ornamentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.22than branches of Cypress which are preciously finished.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.23Monsieur Coustou the artist died in 1777 aged 61. The figures of ReligionComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.24and Hymen were executed by Julian celebrated sculptor broughtComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.25up by Coustou.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.26EpitaphComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.27Here lies, the excellent PrinceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.28Louis Dauphin.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.29Having acquired in the flower of his ageComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.30All that maturity requiresComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.31for governing.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.32In spite of the ardent prayers [--which--]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.33Which all France offered to God,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.34during his sickness.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.35Death, jealous of our happinessComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.36took him from us -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.37Thus France weeps for a PrinceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.38Adorned with all the gifts of Nature ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.39Versed in all the SciencesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.40Which are the resource of Kings.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.41Passionately fond of his countryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.42and the peopleComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.43Whom he was one day to governComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.44The most respectfulComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.45towards his august father.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.46A faithful husband.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.47A Father who made it a dutyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.48To form himselfComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.49His august children to virtueComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.50By his precets [precepts] & exampleComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25r.51That Religion weeps for a Prince ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0010
1834-06-25v.0118ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.02Who, not contentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.03To hear merely the name of Xtian [Christian]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.04Rendered it still more venerableComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.05by the sanctity of his worksComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.06Who, from his earliest youthComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.07Always possessed the most pure mannersComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.08Commendable by profoundComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.09Religion towards GodComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.10And the most exact observationComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.11And the utmost fidelity to his holy law -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.12Full of the most lively faithComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.13Of the firmest hope, ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.14The most ardent charityComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.15He was seen to approach his endComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.16With heroism, truly Xtian [Christian].ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.17Absolutely despising all earthly thingsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.18Sighing with all his soulComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.19After the possession of eternal worthComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.20Full of heavenly consolationComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.21He diedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.22Leaving inexpressible regretComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.2320th December year Notre Sauveur 1765.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.24aged 36 years 3 months & a half -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.25[double horizontal line drawn]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.26Maria-Joseph of Saxe ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.27Dauphine of FranceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.28Whose grief for the death ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.29Her husband is irremediableComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.30Wished to be interred after her death,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.31in the same tomb -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.32In order that the reunion of their ashesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.33Might remain to posterityComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.34An eternal monumentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.35of their mutual love.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.36Equal to Her husbandComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.37In virtue as in tendernessComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.38Yielding at lastComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.39To the bitterness of griefComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.40She diedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.41Worthy of all our regretComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.4213 March 1767. Notre SauveurComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.43aged 35.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.44And having wished to preserveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.45her conjugal [word crossed out] vows even after her death,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.46She was deposited the 23rd of the sameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.47month & the same yearComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.48In this tomb,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.49Which we have bathed with tears.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.50The dead rest in Peace.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.51[double horizontal line drawn]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.52One cannot help admiring the noble & imposing architectureComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.53of this cathedral, of which St. Anastatius, archbishop of this city beganComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.54the foundations 972. It was completely finished under the EpiscopacyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.55of Tristan de Salazar 1532 – his tomb is in the CathedralComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.56Three beautiful roses, in painted glass, placed above the sideComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.57door, one also remarks; that of the north side representing ParadiseComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.58is the most esteemed – In the Chapel of St. Eutropius are alsoComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25v.59glass windows very much admired by connoiseurs [connoisseurs], theyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.0119ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.02were painted by the celebrated John Cousin, one of the founders of theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.03french school, who was born at Soucy near Sens. The high altarComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.04of the choir, & the magnificent drapery which crowns it were putComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.05up in 1742 under the design of Servandoni.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.06[three blank lines]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.10Country about Joigny remarkably pretty – arrived at JoignyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.11[gap] walked to the Church, neat & small, two OleandersComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.12on each side the Altar, a very old tomb, five womenComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.13regarding it two of them the Marys – at one end of it, theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.14man holding the Sponge, at the other the crown of thornsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.15Our Saviour cut in Marble on the top of the tomb, &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.16even the blood streaming from his side, & the [word crossed out] incisionsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.17of the nails in his hands & feet represented – Walked onComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.18boulevard – a very fine bridge – dinner at 8 – very comfortableComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-25r.19rooms, good – dinner & vin ordinaire, [June 26th] off next morning at. [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-26r.19rooms, good – dinner & vin ordinaire, [June 26th] off next morning at. [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-26r.20for Bassout [Bassou] – Café at Bermontent [Vermenton] very tired, dinedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-26r.21at Avallon, lay down on bed – At Avallon 3. hours -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-26r.22slept at Rouvray arrived 95, bed immediately, veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-26r.23comfortable – family there travelling Vetterino [vetturino] they wereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-26r.23off at 3 – [June 27th] Up at 4 oclock breakfasted & off at 7/33 Country veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.24off at 3 – [June 27th] Up at 4 oclock breakfasted & off at 7/33 Country veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.25beautiful all way to Dijon, hills planted with vines, in-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.26terspersed with slips of land, sown with [-corn-] wheat. barley &c -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.27road winding along river Ouche almost all way to Dijon,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.28with very high rocks on other side – passed thro manyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.29very pretty villages, with Churches here & there standing aloneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.30on side of hill – appearance of Dijon as one approachesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.31very pretty – arrived at Hotel de la Cloche 4/28 orderedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.32dinner in an hour, lay down on Sofa, two very comfortableComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.33rooms – dinner best cooked & sent off, of any we haveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27r.34had in France – Vin ordinaire, after dinner walkedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0011
1834-06-27v.0120ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.02about the town – went to the Museum – no very good paintings, exceptComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.03one or two by Ancient Artists – beautiful tombs of Duke of Burgundy &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.04Philip le Hardi, removed from the Chartreuse at the Revolution.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.05the Duke et sa femme, sculptured on the top, & at the sidesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.06most beautiful tabernacle work, in each compartment a monk & [--wo--]manComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.07former with missal en main, but in the centre compartment a monkComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.08et sa femme, with the cowl & hood drawn over their faces, sheComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.09weeping, & he having his hands clasped in an agony of grief -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.10very old door with arms of the French counties carved upon it -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.11A Statue of Bossuet, & busts of a few other celebrated Frenchmen.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.12We [start of word, then a gap of two lines]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.14Went to the Churches of Notre Dame & -- [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.15then to the park getting some orange syrup at a ConfectionersComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.16by the way – Park nothing particular. A l’Hotel at – [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-27v.17went to bed immediately – [June 28th] Up at – [gap] breakfasted,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.18went to bed immediately – [June 28th] Up at – [gap] breakfasted,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.18then went to the Cathedral, the most plain, & least worth seeingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.19of any, I have yet been to in France, not nearly so handsomeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.20as Notre Dame – Priest performing high mass, & saw anotherComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.21priest in the Confessional, with a board placed like a readingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.22desk before his face, so that it could not be seen, & the [person?] con-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.23fessing in a separate box, at the side, who was also concealedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.24except the lower part of her person – appeared to be one orComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.25two fine Monuments but had not time to examine them -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.26Went to the Jardin des Plants, [--just--] lately begun, & tastefullyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.27laid out, something on the plan of that at Paris – a brook windingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.28thro’ the Garden, & [--each--] all the species of one genus of plantsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.29in one bed – very pretty edgings to walks, of Lavender 1/2 yardComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.30high, common sage, box – discovered the name of theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.31plant, whose leaves are quite white, which was in GreenhouseComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28v.32at Crownest – [word crossed out] [u_]Cineraria.[_u] & of the Teazle [u_]Dipsacus.[_u]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.0121ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.02A mount of rock work judiciously placed for wild plants -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.03numbers of Acacia trees. Magnolias, Oleanders, MarigoldsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.04of which the French are particularly fond – Dahlias – Poppy’s & Carnations.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.05Saw at Rokeby Park – a very nice plan for shewing Carnations, ad-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.06vantageously, earth raised about 2 feet in form of a cheese, & bankedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.07up by the branches of large trees split down middle, bark side,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.08outwards, [-these-] [word crossed out]. & plants placed on top – of the earth round edgeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.09then another raising of earth in middle, as if it might be a smallerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.10cheese placed exactly upon a large one – & banked – same way asComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.11first, then a third, – whole beds of the diffrrent varieties ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.12pansies, &c. – back to Hotel, & off for. [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.13country not so pretty after we left Dijon – not at all tiredComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.14detained at [word crossed out] Dole, for want of a postillion two hours -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.15proposed dining which we did – wrote a little in journal. &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.16off for Mont sous vaudré [Vaudrey] at 6 – – [gap] whereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-28r.17we slept – going to bed as soon as we arrived.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-29r.18June 29thComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-29r.19Up at 4 – & off at [--w--] [gap] without breakfast for Poligny – prettyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-29r.20drive, breakfasted there at – – & off for at – . [gap] forComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-29r.21Montrond – country began to be mountainous & very beautifulComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-29r.22ascended a long range of mountain (Jura) toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-29r.23Montrond, then to Champagnole, Maison neuveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-29r.24to St. Laurent to Moray slept there, comfortable apartmentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-29r.25off June 30th at 6/18 oclock for Rousses breakfasted & off at 10/7.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.25off June 30th at 6/18 oclock for Rousses breakfasted & off at 10/7.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.26to la Vattage [Vattay] – 12/21 off to Gex – had a trout, & then offComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.27for Ferney saw Voltaire’s chateau, & [--the--] his room just asComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.28it was when he died. present chateau built in 17 [gap] the old oneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.29being destroyed [--at--] by the Revolution – – guide gave me a pieceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.30of the bark off an elm tree Voltaire planted – a very niceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.31shady walk of Hornbeam, the boughs completely meeting atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.32top, & trained to form an arch – walk about 6 or 8 feet wideComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.33bought a bust of Voltaire, a view of his chateau, the verse he composedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.34the day before his death, & an impression of his seal – he builtComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.35the village of Ferney & there his memory his [is] adored – he alsoComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30r.36built a church close to the gates of his chateau, it is now convertedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0012
1834-06-30v.0122ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.02into a sort of Magasine. Query if Voltaire was in reality what the worldComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.03represents him (an Infidel,) is it not singular that he should have builtComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.04a Church for the worship of God? -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.05[gap of six lines]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.11Spent 50 minutes at Ferney then off for Geneve, where weComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.12arrived about 5/30 – Engaged 4 very comfortable apartments at the Hotel deComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.13Berg – which has been built by a company of gentlemen who have bought thatComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.14quarter of the city & are making great improvements there – they have alsoComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.15constructed a new bridge (sort of suspension) which has only been com-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.16pleted & opened 6 weeks – went to the Post Office 2 letters from myComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.17Sister forwarded from Paris – one of which went first to Heworth Grange.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.18had dinner – then walked out into the town, went to a booksellers,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-06-30v.19& got a plan of Geneva – then returned to Hotel & went to bed -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.20July 1st Up at 7 – breakfasted at 9 – answered my sister’s letter, &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.21Washington’s & wrote to my Aunt whom Mrs. Lister said in her letterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.22was very much hurt that she did not know sooner I was comingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.23abroad tho’ it had been talked of by all the world for someComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.24months – said to my Aunt that I was sorry to hear this, it was outComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.25of my powers to tell her sooner as I did not know myself &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.26wrote to her, & my sister, as soon as it was fixed, that to themComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.27I had never been intentionally uncommunicative, & that itComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.28was very unlike me, to tell my plans to all the world butComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.29herself (my Aunt). To Washington, I wrote to decline Mr. Lampleugh Hird’s pro-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.30posal to take Lidgate. & said I would rather wait, & let the house &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.31land undivided even if I got less – – kept a copy of this letterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.32sent my signature & date, for Washington to fill up with a noticeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.33to quit for Thomas Greaves – To my sister (whose eyes are still very bad)ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01v.34said I hope she would have the best advice for them, if they were notComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01r.0123ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01r.02soon better. Told her about my letter to Washington, our route toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01r.03Geneva, my letter of the 28th April which I concluded she had neverComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01r.04received – my Aunt being hurt at not sooner being apprised ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01r.05my coming abroad – that I wrote both to her & my Aunt asComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-01r.06soon as it was fixed.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-02r.07July 2nd Went to the Toporama – to the Pension – heard of &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-02r.08saw Miss Pickford, & Miss Maitland. they intended to return toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-02r.09England tuesday next on account of Mrs. Alexander who was very ill – quite trueComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-02r.10Miss Pickford has lost a considerable sum of money by her friendComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-02r.11Miss Thredfeld [Threlfall] who died in West Indies 2 years ago – back to dinner atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-02r.126 – a violent Thunder storm -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-03r.13July 3rd Up & off for Bonneville at 1 1/2 – violent thunder stormComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-03r.14arrived at Bonneville 5 – Postillion cheated us about theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-03r.15Carabiniers -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-04r.16July 4th Off to Sallenche [Sallanches] where we breakfasted – left EugenieComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-04r.17& carriage & off for Chamouni [Chamonix] at 1 – bought at Servoz a herbary -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-04r.18stopped at St. Gervase – where every body but the sick dine atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-04r.19Table d’hote – Char-a-banc detestable – [word crossed out] Thunder stormComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-04r.20arriv[e]d at Chamouni 5 1/2 – quite wet, & obliged to go to bed hadComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-04r.21no change of clothes – David Folignet guide came -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.22July 5th – Went to Montanvert, & on to the MerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.23de Glace, where [--we--] I picked up . [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.24a little rain before we got down from theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.25Mountain, had some boiled milk, & lay downComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.26on the bed for 1/2 hour – then went to see the Church -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.27A- [Anne] had a long conversation with the Priest. aboutComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.28England & the Protestant Religion – went to see the livingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.29Chamois. bought a model of the mountains – dined atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-05r.30630. went to bed could not sleep, got up & was very sick -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-06r.31July 6th Did not rise till near 8 o’clock – A- [Anne] had aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-06r.32long packing of our things, some of which we left at Cha-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-06r.33mouni – on our Mules & off ab[ou]t . [gap] forComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-06r.34the mountains, very tired, & got off to rest beforeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0013
1834-07-06v.0124ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.02we got to the top of – – – sat down & cried, got aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.03little Noyau – then mounted & went to the top – as we wereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.04descending, saw guide who accompanied Baron Muller, who told ourComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.05Guides – when he had got part of way en route he said to him, heComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.06had lost . francs, the Guide proposed turning back to lookComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.07for them, he said it was such a reflection & disgrace upon him,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.08Baron Muller would not allow this but proposed borrowing money,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.09which the people lent at . [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.10not to him, but to the guide, when he got to Martigny heComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.11said he should go to Turin where he gave the Guide the slip, & leftComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.12him with 5 francs in his pocket – he had left his carriageComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.13at Chamouni, which the people [-sold-] seized for sale, he had boughtComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.14it at Geneva, without paying for it, so that the Maker came overComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.15to Chamouni to buy it again for what he could. crossed theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.16Vosa [Vauzaz] down to Contamine, arrived at 5 – dined, had VinComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-06v.17d’Asti, went to bed – Up [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.18July 7th Up at 7 1/2 got a cup of Coffee, saw the Church, & offComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.19for Nant Bourrant, where we breakfasted, ascendedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.20Col de Bonhomme, heard story of Mr. Campbell &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.21Mr. Rowley being starved to death in September 1832 – theyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.22had breakfasted & were off late from Nant Bourrant,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.23did not get to top of Mountain till 2 oclock in the day,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.24rain, & snow then came on, & the cold took hold ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.25Mr. Rowley who could not walk -, when his cousin sawComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.26him dying, he became [u_] panic struck [_u], & begged themComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.27to leave him to die also, however this they would not do,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.28& the guide carried him on his back to the firstComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.29chalet, those only who have travelled the road,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.30can form an accurate idea of the difficulty of thisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07v.31carrying him; when arrived at the Chalet, the guideComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.0125ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.02left him to the Care of its inhabitants & two remainingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.03companions, & set off with the shepherds to fetch the deadComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.04man from the top of the mountain, in guides absence, theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.05unfortunate young man was put into warm sheetsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.06instead of being rolled in the snow, & thus his life wasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.07sacrificed, the vital spark having fled before the return ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.08guide; the two dead men were carried down toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.09Chapu, where their unhappy companionsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.10passed the night, next day then proceeded, to Geneva,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.11where they had the two gents embalmed & sent toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.12England – Mr. Rowley was about forty, & Mr. CampbellComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.13an only son of a Gentleman in London about 22 – – – -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.14Much snow & no track over the Col de Bonhomme,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.15sent our Mules before us to make a path, – -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.16crossed 21 small vallies [valleys] of snown [snow], An hourComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.17in [word crossed out] the snow in crossing Col des Fours. – then -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.18went thro’ a pretty valley to Mottet – a mereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.19chalet – but a comfortable apartment between cows, & theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.20hay loft – woman very civil, & quick in putting upComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.21a curtain for a dressing room – some excellent muttonComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.22for dinner, afterwards went out, & talked to theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.23wife, husband & brother, they only live there aboutComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.242 months in the year, & then go to Bourg St. MauriceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.25for the winter, they had not been a month in the chaletComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-07r.26when we were there –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-08r.27July 8th Up at 5 – breakfasted, then crossed the Alle [Allée]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-08r.28Blanche & Lake Combal, stopped at a Chalet inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-08r.29Col de la Seigne to eat poulet – saw people making cheeseComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0014
1834-07-08v.0126ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-08v.02road in some parts close to the border of Lake Combal -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-08v.03arrived at Cormayeur [Courmayeur] at 4 oclock – dinner at 5.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-08v.04excellent, red Vin d’Asti – but a very poor dinner -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-08v.05dearest spoke to Maitre d’hotel, who said it was accidental,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-08v.06& that we should fare better another time -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.07July 9th off from Cormayeur at 8 – breakfasted atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.08Pré St. Didier, valley beautiful – had a veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.09good view of Mont Blanc – road in some partsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.10cut out of a rock at the top of a deep valley; oneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.11of the prettiest vallies [valleys] we have seen – lunched atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.12Arvier, pretty little Church on top of hill, trium-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.13phal arch, temporary erection, to celebrate the arrivalComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.14of the two Sardinian Princes (eldest about 12 years of age) atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.15Cormayeur, where they were expected next day -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.16[u_] arrived at Aosta ab[ou]t 6/15 [_u] all Ecu de FranceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.17engaged for Princes except one room close to salle àComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.18manger – [u_] went to Hotel de la poste [_u] – comfortable apartmentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.19walked about town – saw some Candlesticks beautifullyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.20carved in oak – they were for one of the Churches & wereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.21to be gilt – went to the Church – bought some ribbon forComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.22habit, & some soap – dined in salle à manger atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.23815 – went to bed – had first Apricots this year -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-09v.24bother about passport not able to get it done that night -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10v.25July 10th – Passport sent back at 6/30 breakfasted & set offComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10v.26at 10 – guide Michel not able to get his passportComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10v.27signed in time to set off with us, he overtook us at aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10v.28single house by way side, [--where--] near Etrobe [Etroubles], whereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10v.29we eat fowl – & I [-laid-] lay down on bed, then on to St.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10v.30Remy – got into apartment where were a Lady & gentleman fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.0127ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.02Chamouni who had passed us on our way to Aosta, veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.03civilly begged us to enter, lady was English [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.04a widow with a good fortune gentleman & she told us she wasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.05related to the Duke of Argyle, & acquainted with Mrs. &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.06Miss Campbell, who were waiting at Geneva till weatherComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.07was favorable for ascending Mont Blanc – Mrs. CampbellComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.08has lately bought a house near Inverness – she about 50ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.09& her daughter 30 years of age – good figure, not veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.10tall – Gentleman was a Russian – in the army, &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.11married for money – at least so supposed – theyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.12left for St. Bernard soon after we sat down toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.13dinner – [--we--] heard story of 3 servants from theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.14[--convent--] Hospice, being lost in snow . . .ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.15bodies not found till following spring – ascent allComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.16the way from St. Remy to St. Bernard – road betterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.17than usual up such mountains – arrived atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.18[u_]St. B..... [Bernard][_u] Monk very civil walked out on terraceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.19& went to site of temple of Jupiter, picked up aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.20small piece of Roman brick – situation of HospiceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.21rather picturesque, but cold bleak & snow clad – aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.22small lake in front & here & there a little squareComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.23garden plot on side of hill – air very cold, largeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.24fires in salle a manger – large party at Supper -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.25a clergy man of name of Walker, a [?] awkwardComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.26looking man, spoke in raptures of the Forclaze &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.27Tete Noire: another gentleman, officer in army with hisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.282 sons, represented in exaggeration the difficulties heComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.29encountered in travelling from Chamouni the veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10r.30route we had taken just before him -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0015
1834-07-10v.0128ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-10v.02my neighbour, most gentlemanly of the party, a young Englishman,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-10v.03who was in bad health had been on the Continent sinceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-10v.04last October, travelled a good deal in Italy – went toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-10v.05bed as soon as we could –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.06July 11th not well – left breakfast table to lie down -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.07Monks gave dearest some plants (Alpine) & recommendationComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.08to clergyman at Orsiere, if we slept there – saw theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.09Morgues, a sort of chapel where people who have perishedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.10in the snow are placed, that they may be recognised byComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.11their friends – & the chapel, a neat little edifice, in itComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.12is a monument to memory of General Desaix, who decidedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.13the victory at Marengo in favor of the French. from 7 to 8000ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.14persons annually visit St. Bernard off about 12 – dined atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.15Liddes – & arrived at Village du Ferrêt about ten, & onlyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.16[--one--] two rooms for us, guides, George & widow with 8 children -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.17two children slept in our room that cried half the night -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-11v.18did not undress –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-12v.19July 12th – Breakfasted & off at 8 – crossed Col duComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-12v.20Ferret, ascent of mountain very steep, got a thirdComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-12v.21guide to top – beautiful view – after descent, wentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-12v.22along valley thro’ Presec to Cormayeur, saw baths thereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-12v.23arrived about 4 o’clock – washed – dined at 6 – walked outComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-12v.24saw the Princes’ fourgon[--g--] a tool box, & small roundComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-12v.25box for oil, suspended underneath it – went to bed as soon asComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-12v.26we returned to the Inn – a great noise in Salle a mangerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13v.27July 13th Up at 9 – breakfasted & off about 10 – thro Pre St. DidierComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13v.28Goletta, Pont Seran, along the Isere, to the petit St. Bernard -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13v.29lunched at the Hospice on Turkey & cheese, no monks there,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13v.30church not finished – 2 leagues of descent to BourgComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13r.0129ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13r.02St. Maurice – on [gap] ordered supper – fish &c -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13r.03people said no fish to be had, & so cross that dearest had onlyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13r.04bread & milk & I part of Turkey – valley beautiful &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-13r.05scenery lovely – Isere makes great ravages in winter -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.06July 13th [should be July 14th] Breakfasted & off at 9 – for Chapu [Les Chapieux] – rain cameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.07on – heard story of the two English gents who were lost inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.08September 1832 – Chapu a very small place consisting of twoComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.09or three chalets – ascent from there in some placesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.10almost perpendicular – snow on Col de BonhommeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.11considerably less than when we passed just 8 daysComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.12before – saw nearly 100 peasants who had beenComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.13ordered out by King to mend the roads – threw a stoneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.14on monument to 3 English ladies who were lost atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.15foot of Col de Bonhomme – dearest had long conversationComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.16with two peasants – told them they were in grandeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.17toilette, & one very pretty, praised them for notComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.18being married – said they lived with their parentsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.19& were mantua makers – remarked the superiorComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.20make of dearest Pelisse & my habit – arrived atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-14r.21Contamine at 7 o’clock – good dinner & beds -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.22July 14th [should be July 15th] Up at 6 – breakfasted & off about 9 – thro’ valley ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.23Bionassey to Mont Vosa – thence to Temple deComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.24Belle Vue, where we saw a frenchman making notesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.25who afterwards ascended Mont Blanc as far asComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.26Grand plateau, with an avocat from Sallenche -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.27& 6 peasants – they went no further, & fortunate it was theyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.28returned as a thunder storm came on, & mostComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.29probably they would otherwise have been all lost, onlyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15r.30one of the party ever having been at the top of the Mont.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0016
1834-07-15v.01[30]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-15v.02remained half hour at Belle Vue, then descended Vosa toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-15v.03Ouches [Houches] & [--Ch--] arrived at Chamouni about 6 oclock – hadComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-15v.04the opposite room to one we occupied before, which is muchComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-15v.05nicer, more commodious, & has a very good view ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-15v.06Mont Blanc – dined & went to bed -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-16v.07July 16th ascended Mont Brevent – I walked 3 parts of wayComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-16v.08to Chalet lie down there whilst dearest went to Cheminée,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-16v.09descent very rapid – walked all way down even to theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-16v.10Inn – stopped to get our little Model of the Mountains.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-17v.11July 17th Up at 7 – Two Avocats, one from Chambery, otherComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-17v.12from Sallenche with 6 peasants set off on the ascentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-17v.13of Mont Blanc – at 10 off for Martigny – through Argentiere,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-17v.14Le Tour, over Col de Balme – got poulet at theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-17v.15Temple de Belle Vue. Descending [u_] scenery beautiful [_u]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-17v.16arrived at Martigny about 8 – dinner & went to bed -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-17v.17comfortable apartment bit by Mosquitoes -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.18July 18th got a Char, & David put in one of MulesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.19& drove us to Bex – road very good travelled onComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.20Simplon – to [gap] passed cascadeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.21de Pis vache [Pissevache]. arrived at Bex about 2 – a very prettyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.22looking Inn with a nice Garden – thunder storm aboutComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.233/30 played on Piano – 4 dishes of fruit for luncheon -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.24dinner at 5 – best we have had on the Continent -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.25left Bex about 7 – not a bed to be had in town – told usComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.26at [--Bex--] St. Maurice it would be impossible for us to crossComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.27the torrent – went to it, & found plenty of men whoComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.28were busy clearing away the wreck, they carried usComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18v.29over on their backs, & then dragged our little charComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18r.01[31]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18r.02thro’ – & drove our frightened mule before them -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18r.03when we passed in the morning, there was merely aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18r.04small stream of water, & a nice little foot bridge,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18r.05which we found on our return totally demolished -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-18r.06much lightening all way to Martigny, arrived 9/15 -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.07July 19th Breakfasted & left Martigny about 9 – on ascendingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.08mountan [mountain] overtook another guide with two mules, heComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.09mounted one of ours up the hill, & an English gentlemanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.10who promised to give him 10 francs – stopped atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.11Inn on Tete Noire – heard gentleman buying someComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.12minerals – Lady Guilford. bought a rock onComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.13Tete Noire, where are inscribed some verses inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.14french, badly translated into English – arrivedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.15at Chamouni about 7/30 – dearest went to a NaturalistComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.16& order a complete collection of plants – [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.17which is to be ready next July – she saw also JosephComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.18Coute – who said he was going next day with a PrincessComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-19r.19to Martigny – washed dearest gloves -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.20July 20th Up at 7 – after breakfast went to Church -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.213 sunday after [gap] – [gap] a longComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.22procession of people who carried host round theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.23Church – on our return read 2nd chapter of St. John, &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.24then mounted our mules & went to Flegere -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.25very extensive & fine view, saw 5 glaciers all at once.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.26Mont Blanc clouded over – went to Chalet where cowsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.27are kept 80 in number, drank some of the milk – returnedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.28to eat poulet in chalet at top of mountain: when weComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.29had very nearly got to the bottom, [--rain came on--] a thunderComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20r.30storm came on, dearest had no cloak & rode on to theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0017
1834-07-20v.01[32]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-20v.02as fast as she could I followed her & was there 8 minutesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-20v.03after her – rain continued all evening, night, & till 3 oclockComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-20v.04next day -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-21v.05July 21st David came about 8 – to enquire what we intendedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-21v.06to do, said we had determined to leave Chamouni for Geneva.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-21v.07settled every thing dearest bought me box of minerals, & offComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-21v.08from Chamouni about 12 – at Servoz bought specimen ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-21v.09Quartz – at Sallenche about 5 – off from there atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-21v.107 – at Bonneville at 12 – went to bed immediately veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-21v.11tired –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-22v.12July 22nd Up at 6 – dearest repacked things, put on cleanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-22v.13linens – breakfasted & off about 11 – at Geneva 20/4 – gotComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-22v.14money & letters at Bank – letters at Post Office from Mrs. ListerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-22v.15Mrs Lawton & my sister – dined at 6 – then wrote toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-22v.16my sister & part of a letter to Mrs. Lister – told my sisterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-22v.17to direct to Paris ‘pour le retour’ & advised her to getComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-22v.18blue spectacles – bed at 12 -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-23v.19July 23rd Up at 5 – copied letter for dearest at 1 went toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-23v.20[--performance of Music in Church – Music good but--]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-23v.21[--singing very inferior – when over--] went to Bookseller’s shopComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-23v.22to Bautte’s, & to a collection of minerals – bought a quere oldComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-23v.23chinese head, & a few other specimens – dinner at 6/50ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-23v.24or 7 – [--went to bed wrote part of a letter to my Aunt--] bought Prints of places we had seen en route.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-24v.25July 24th Up at 6 – wrote part of a letter to my Aunt.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-24v.26at 1 went to performance of music in Church singingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-24v.27very inferior, but Music, good – when over went toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-24v.28bookseller’s shop. dinner at 7 – letter from my Sister -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-25v.29July 25th Finished letter to my Aunt, told her we should returnComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-25v.30home end of August at 12 went to performance in Theatre,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0018
1834-07-25r.01[33]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.02which did not commence till 2 oclock – even at that hour, got inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.03with considerable difficulty, took the last bench in pit, TheatreComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.04very prettily decorated, 3 tiers of boxes, being covered with whiteComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.05calico, & wreaths of roses & leaves round the top & bottomComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.06of each tier, in the first tier the arms of the 24 cantonsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.07of Swissland displayed – singing better than at Church -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.08Monsieur Drouet’s performance on flute in Overture to DerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.09Freischutz, [u_] perfect [_u]. a complete beau sat before us, hisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.10hair curled in ringlets at the back – when over, went toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.11Museum – founded by Monsieur Rath – born at died at GenevaComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.12but a general in Russian service born 1768 – died 1819 -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.13he gave most of the pictures, & his daughters built theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.14mansion, & gave it to the town – statuary all plasterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.15of Paris. a painting of two children lost in the snow atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.16St. Bernard – rain came on, had to wait there tillComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-25r.17nearly fair – dined at 6/30 Took a drawing of Screen & sofa.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.18July 26th Up at 6 – [--breakfasted--], took another drawing ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.19Screen & one of chair – breakfasted – sent letter to myComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.20Aunt to Post Office went to Bookseller’s shop bought Precis de l’HistoireComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.21Moderne – Par Monsieur Michelet – Bruxelles – 1824 – 5th EditionComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.22& a parcel of other works – back to Inn & off at – 12/45 & offComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.23to Feigere – then to Cruseilles – beautiful view of Lake ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.24Geneva – for several miles after leaving town – theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.25mountain of Saléve on the left & on the right sometimesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.26gentle slopes down to valley, sometimes, mountains -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.27the scenery from Geneva to Annecy presents an am-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.28phitheatre of mountains – & is beautiful & picturesqueComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.29in the extreme – this road is seldom travelled theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.30other to Aix being about 2 miles shorter – At Hotel deComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26r.31Genève at Annecy at 7 – walked 15 minutes along theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26v.01[34]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26v.02Promenade shaded by Poplars & [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26v.03on each side – dinner & went to bed – 2 rooms – dearest cameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-26v.04and wrote journal in mine till I was asleep -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.05July 27th Up at 7 – breakfasted in salle à manger, readComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.06prayers in our own room – took a char a bonne [char-a-banc], to headComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.07of Lake – off at 9/57. to Douane [Duingt]. back at small Inn whereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.08we eat poulet – saw chateau called châteauvieux – propertyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.09of Marquis de Salle [Sales] before revolution, now belongs to MonsieurComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.10Bertie [Berthet], not in good order – rooms painted in compart-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.11ments – pretty vue from chateau – Monsieur Bertie had a son afterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.12he had been married 15 years – it lived till it was six years old,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.13& his wife has never looked up since, they go to Geneva inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.14the winter – present Marquis de Salle wishes to re purchaseComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.15the property but he thinks too great a price is asked – about £4000ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.16English money – on return at 2/30 walked to the Castle, nowComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.17used for Barracks – & to the Churches – off for Alby atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.183/33 – fine & beautiful mountains, not a bed to be hadComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.19at Aix – nor even dinner – saw the Baths which the invalidsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.20frequent & their source, L’enfer, is particularly hot; theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.21Roman Baths at Madame Perier’s are very singular.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.22discovered about 2 years ago – walls an immense thickness -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.23Aix was brought into repute in the reign of Henry 4th of FranceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.24but there was no accommodation for the poor, tillComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.25an Englishman gave a million of francs for the com-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.26mencement of an Hospital, the King of Sardinia soonComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.27sent a very handsome addition to this sum, & the buildingComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.28completed [gap] so that the poor now receive everyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27v.29attention & accommodation: begging is entirely forbiddenComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27r.01[35]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27r.02during the season, which commences with the first fine daysComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27r.03in May & lasts till September – about 3000 strangers gene-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27r.04rally visit the baths annually – saw little of road toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27r.05Chambery, as it was quite dark most of the way, & tenComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27r.06oclock when we arrived at Hotel, [u_] Parfaite Union [_u] apart[men]tComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27r.07lofty good size & very comfortable beds – 11. when weComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-27r.08sat down to supper -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.09July 28th Up at 7 – & breakfasted in salle à manger, noComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.10other company being in the house, walked into town, someComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.11of streets wery [very] narrow, but the principal one [- large -] long &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.12wide – went to Booksellers shop – bought prints of Savoy -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.13read part of book giving advice to young [- people -] Ladies; ‘alwaysComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.14to seek friends & company of their own sex – & not to letComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.15their conversations with the other be too long or too frequent.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.16she who courts danger is sure to perish by it, anComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.17example given of the fatal effects of this -’ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.18gained advice & directions about going to Aix – went toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.19Hotel de la Poste to enquire about carriages, engagedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.20a char to go this afternoon to Bout du mond [Bout du Monde], & aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.21Phaeton for tomorrow to Aix &c – saw the rooms, smallerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.22than at the Parfaite Union – but newly done up & a salonComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.23to each apartment (en suite). walked to Charmette, (by theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.24way eat Green gages) formerly the residence of MadameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.25de Varens [Warens], & [word crossed out] Rousseau, a bed chair is theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.26only remnant of Rousseau’s furniture, a portrait of himComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.27in one of the rooms; a beautiful view of the town of ChamberyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.28& the country from Madame de Varen’s apartment very smallComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.29garden – returned by Terrace on which Rousseau used to walk -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.30he was of very low origin, said to be the son of a watchmakerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28r.31at Geneva, & came to Charmette, to be Madame de VarensComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0019
1834-07-28v.01[36]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.02servant – lovely view in descending to the town – got someComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.03poulet at the hotel, & then set off to le bout du mond [Le Bout du Monde] -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.04scenery of the mountains, along road very beautiful, really ap-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.05pears the end of the world, a sort of Basin surrounded byComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.06an immense rock, which bounds any further view, outComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.07of which issues a considerable cascade, & several smallerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.08ones, the large one freezes like all others in winter, butComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.09the water of two of the smaller ones, is quite cold in summerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.10but perfectly hot in winter – no person has yet accountedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.11for this phenomenon – these cascades supply a paper millComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.12close by – saw the[--re--] process – rags are first sorted, then putComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.13into an immense boiler which washes & [--condenses--] rings! [wrings] themComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.14then put into another boiler which reduces them to pulp -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.15this pulp is reduced to a yet finer state in a thirdComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.16[--out of which it i--] into which they dip wire trays, on which theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.17liquid consolidates sufficiently to be turned on to aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.18piece of coarse woollen cloth, when all the cloths areComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.19filled they are placed in large presses – bought some ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.20the paper – saw what is called coal in this country, but itComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.21appeared (tho’ dug out of the earth) more like burnt woodComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.22than anything else, & broke in pieces as easily: as we returnedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.23stopped at Monsieur Barin’s [Burdin’s] public garden – Dearest spoke about boy & said weComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.24would go [--next day--] on wednesday – just as we got back to the Inn, a violent thunderComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-28v.25storm, 8 o’clock, dined, & went to bed -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29v.26July 29th At 9 – off to Aix, saw waterfall of Gresy, where in 18[--25--]13.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29v.27Madame de Bourc [de Broc] – maid of honor to [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29v.28met her death by falling into one of the crevices; in theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29v.29endeavor to extricate her, her gown gave way, which made herComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29v.30head bound against the side of rock & the blow killed her; herComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29v.31husband was killed in Napoleon’s campaign in RussiaComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.01[37]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.02that day twelve months preceding – then to Lake Bourget which weComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.03crossed in a boat with a french lady & gentleman & their little girlComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.04from Lyons, to the Monastery of Hautecombe, where the SardiniaComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.05Kings, till the last 5 generations were buried – all the tombsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.06are of Seyssel stone which is quite white, but the whiteness hasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.07more the hue of plaster of Paris than of marble – there areComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.08four large [word crossed out] paintings, one of Xt [Christ] in the Temple & theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.09Magi very good, & two others, one of Xt [Christ] healing the youngComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.10man at the pool of Bethesda & [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.11saw a small brick chapel near, & the sculptor’s studio – asComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.12well as the apartments for the king & Queen – [--waterfall of--] & inter-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.13mittent fountain, but no water in it at the time we wereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.14there: on return to boat. french gentleman very cross said we had keptComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.15him waiting 3/4 hour – conversation – about Grand Chartreuse gentlemanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.16said [--no--] ladies were never admitted – at Aix went to châteauComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.17only just in time for their carriage broke down – Temple ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.18Diana converted into a Theatre, the walls are composedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.19Of [u_] very [_u] large stones, regularly compacted one above anotherComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.20without cement. close to it is a new building, containing ball roomsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.21library &c – balls every night in small salon, & on thursdaysComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.22& sunday every week in the large salon – L’Arc de Campanus.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.23An hour in getting carriage repaired walked in MademoiselleComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.24de Verney’s garden – & went to a bookseller’s, dark soon afterComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.25we left Aix, at Chambery at 10 o’clock – house quite full, veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-29r.26poor dinner.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-30r.27July 30th Up at 8. [--aft--] wrote journal & read till 3 oclock, wentComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-30r.28to Bookseller’s shop, then got a char at Hotel de la PosteComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-30r.29to take us to [--the--] Monsieur Barin’s public garden, he has aboveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-30r.3020 English acres of ground & sometimes 250 labourers employed.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-30r.31rain came on just as we left the garden, & we only just got to HotelComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-30r.32when a violent thunder storm came onComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0020
1834-07-30v.01[38]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-30v.02it rained all night & quite put an end to our intentionComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-30v.03of going in an open carriage to Les Echelles –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.04July 31st – Dearest up at four, but rain having continued allComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.05night relinquished intention of going in open carriage & set out aboutComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.063 oclock in our own – country very pretty, 3 postes to Les Echelles,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.07derived its name from a torrent having anciently [--mad--] wornComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.08a hole thro’ the rock, which was the only road from Chambery,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.09till Charles Emanuel made another, or improved the oldComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.10one in 1670 – this road being dangerous being liable to piecesComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.11of rock & rubbish falling, in winter & during strong rains -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.12Buonaparte issued an order to all Engineers to produceComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.13plans for its improvement, after mature deliberationComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.14it was thought best to make another by piercing theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.15rock higher up, & the present road, was begun, stoppedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.16& resumed by the french, & finally completed by [gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.17[gap] King of Sardinia – At 6 oclock in morn[in]gComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.18Partner from Monsieur Barin – Gardiner [gardener], came with Plants for herbaryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.19for us to look at, declined taking them, but we ordered one toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.20contain all the Plants of the Alps, on white paper, for 1000 francs,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.21dearest offered to advance person money if he required it, he declined,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.22but about 2 o’clock just before we set off came again to ask for 200ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.23francs. of course dearest advanced it, but [--we--] thought it veryComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.24odd, that he did not take it when she first offered it, & uponComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.25telling him so & talking to him he seemed very muchComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.26ashamed of himself & would have left the money if dearest would haveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.27allowed him – At Les Echelles at 6 oclock – dinner at 7.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-07-31v.28went to bed early –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01v.29August 1st Up at 6 – & engaged a char, to take us at 9 oclockComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01v.30to Pont St. Laurent, at time could not get Passport, so had toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01v.31wait for it till man returned, this delayed us till 9 1/2 – then off – DouaneComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01v.32on entering France, turned out our char & wished to search ourComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.01[39]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.02persons till dearest shewed our Passport – at Pont St. Laurent. 1/2 hourComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.03in getting our Mules & guide – ride to Grand Chartreuse parti-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.04cularly fine, high mountains, & ravine & gorge finest I everComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.05saw – road very good for mountains, only part bad or very narrowComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.06was near a wire mill, & that they were widening & improving -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.07a newly strong wall banks up the road, which was the only meansComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.08of preventing its being swept away in winter: rain came on,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.09about 10 minutes before we got to what is called an Auberge,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.10when in less than half an hour a violent thunder stormComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.11came on – ate poulet, & lay down on bench – [word crossed out] an agedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.12Priest was in the room with two females when we went. one ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.13the monks of the Chartreuse dressed in white woollen – theseComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.14monks are not allowed to wear any linen, in place ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.15a shirt, they have only a tunic of serge. the white woollen dress isComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.16fastened by a leather girdle or a hemp cord. the head isComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.17shaven, they sleep on straw mattresses, & have only sheets -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.18by & by another party of 2 gents a lady & her 2 daughters cameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.19in – stayed there till 3/30 unwillingness of our guide toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.20leave, & his attempt to cheat us by charging 43 sous for hisComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.21dinner when it only cost him 15. in returning he was quiteComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.22Lame, my mule stumbled, & I then dismounted &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.23changed with dearest in a short time guide was so lameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.24we had to mount him on George’s mule, & GeorgeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.25got up behind me: only just 2 hours in going fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.26Grand Chartreuse to Pont St. Laurent, & 40 minutes fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.27thence to Les Echelles: diner [dinner] ready, afterwards wroteComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-01r.28to Mrs. Lister & went to bed –ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-02r.29August 2nd Up at 6 – riz au lait & strawberries toComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-02r.30breakfast – room charged 8 francs in bill.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-02r.31dearest complained about, & explained that it wasComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-02r.32more than we paid even at Geneva – off about 10/30ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-02r.33got out at old road – at Parfaite Union atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0021
1834-08-02v.01[40]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.022/30 had cold poulet, & wine, then went to Booksellers, &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.03Monsieur Barin’s garden – saw the preparation for taking suckers ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.04Rose trees & Plants; 3 cornered piece of sheet lead, with bottomComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.05corner cut off so [doodle of piece of lead] branch of plant slit up just above jointComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.06first slit across, & then a little way up – then 2 holes made inComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.07lead as marked, string put thro these holes & tied to the [u_] branch [_u]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.08or if that be too weak, to a stronger branch, then the lead doubledComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.09up like a cup below the slit sucker, & filled with earth. query does aComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.10stick support the sucker? walked back again to Hotel, & stormComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.11came on – those Dahlias are best which do not shew anyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.12seed in the centre of the flower – Arbor Vitae make beautifulComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.13hedges, & in 5 or 6 years grow very high – Wrote part of Journal,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-02v.14went to bed early -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.15August 3rd Up at 6 – breakfasted & off at 9 – no trouble aboutComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.16Bill, all quite fair according to agreement & right, did not chargeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.17cold poulet – country beautiful, particularly all the valleyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.18down to Bourg Maurice, examination of Boot of carriageComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.19by Doame [Douane], on entering France, at [gap] . [gap] – rain cameComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.20on about 2 oclock – at Grenoble, & at Les AmbassadeursComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.21Hotel, by 3/30 comfortable apartments, rain continued so couldComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.22not go out – dinner at 6 – capital, & abundance. wroteComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.23part of journal, went to bed 10/9 – did not sleep well, bowelComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-03v.24complaint at 5 morning -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04v.25August 4th Bowel complaint continued all day till 2 o’clock,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04v.26at 3 walked out into the town – went to Bookseller’s, a jewelers,ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04v.27bought nothing – at another booksellers bought a History of GrenobleComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04v.28& its environs, from its foundation, under the name ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04v.29Cularo, to our times by P. P. [J.J.] A. Pilot. went to a mineralo-ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04v.30gist’s, saw some beautiful specimens, of the different mineralsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04v.31of this country, mounted 6 flights of stairs, to see moreComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04v.32minerals, saw also a plan of Elba, & a very curious lock, whichComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04r.01[41]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04r.02no one could open unless the person recollected the way he had lastComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04r.03turned it – had a pamphlet of the [--amateurs--] masters, & amateursComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04r.04who had paintings in the Exhibition at Lyons – went to a GloveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04r.05shop bought 3 pairs of dark colored Gloves – then returned to dinnerComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04r.06& to bed at 9 – dearest had Pictures & Minerals to look at thatComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-04r.07Landlord wanted to sell -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.08August 5th – Up at 5 – bowel complaint again – breakfasted atComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.098 – at 10 set off in a little carriage to Sassenack [Sassenage] – crossedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.10an iron bridge (suspension) only been completed 6 yearsComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.11but wood being all bad they have it to replace withComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.12better, only one side is yet done – length of bridgeComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.13[gap]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.14Sassenash [Sassenage] is situated, at foot of a steep hill, fromComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.15this hill a beautiful view of Grenoble, the rivers, IsereComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.16& Drac – & opposite mountains, which were unfortunatelyComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.17covered with clouds – I stayed in middle of hill, whilstComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.18dearest went to top – said she had a much more extensiveComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.19& more lovely view – & very fine meadows there -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.20at Sassenage famous for its cheese, we saw its celebratedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.21Grotoes [grottoes], the cascades, & singular rise of the water from theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.22rock which cannot be seen without a candle – [word crossed out] guideComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.23told us he intended to build a Pavilion to shut theComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.24woods out, from those who would go there without him, heComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.25has lately bought this wood for 300 francs – [--as we return--] sawComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.26the Sapey [Sappey] so much spoken of – as we returned sawComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.27in [gap] a Poplar cut down ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.28extraordinary length 84 [--yards--] feet – then to the RomanComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.29bridge on new road to Marseilles, which is not quiteComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.30finished & some parts of it are very bad – bridge ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.31one arch, & exceedingly – two of its [--most--] best characterics [characteristics]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05r.32of being Roman, as [letter crossed out] it is put together with MortarComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0022
1834-08-05v.01[42]ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023
1834-08-05v.02which is not usually case with Roman bridges or buildings.ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023
1834-08-05v.03exceedingly tired, back to Hotel, dined, & went to bed -ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023
1834-08-06v.04August 6th. Up at 5 again with bowel complaint, lay downComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023
1834-08-06v.05again for some time, & up at 6/30 only one cup ofComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023
1834-08-06v.06coffee at breakfast & went away being very unwell – shewedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023
1834-08-06v.07George how to mend his stockings – read a little, dearest orderedComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023
1834-08-06v.08me broth & fricandeau, & then went to see the Castle &ComparisonWYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023WYC:1525/7/1/5/1/0023
1834-08-06v.09barracks & – Eat my broth & fricandeau, & then wroteComparison